Retroactive: Detective Comics 1947 & Amazing Spider-Man 1971

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Detective Comics (1947)
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Detective Comics #119(January 1947)dc119

Detective Comics #120(February 1947)dc120

Detective Comics #121(March 1947)dc121

Detective Comics #122(April 1947)dc122

Detective Comics #123(May 1947)dc123

Detective Comics #124(June 1947)dc124

Detective Comics #125(July 1947)dc125

Detective Comics #126(August 1947)dc126

Detective Comics #127(September 1947)dc127

Detective Comics #128(October 1947)dc128

Detective Comics #129(November 1947)dc129

Detective Comics #130(December 1947)dc130

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7 thoughts on “Retroactive: Detective Comics 1947 & Amazing Spider-Man 1971

  1. My favorite Batman cover is Detective Comics # 120, because it reverses the abitual pattern of the first Detective Comics covers: instead of having the villain in a giant size and the heroes in a lilliputian size, we have exactly the opposite. It’s something new and unexpected, and I appreciated it.
    As for Spidey, there’s no doubt that ASM # 100 is by far the best one, but at least 2 other covers are close behind.
    ASM # 96 has a “pulpy noir feel” I absolutely adore: a dark city, some cops, a man apparently died… if the penciller had thrown in a man with a trench coat (and a cigarette in his mouth) in the background, it would have been a perfect pulpy noir cover.
    The bronze medal goes to ASM # 93. Honestly, the only reason why I gave a prize to this cover is the presence of Prowler. Only in the Spider Man world there are a lot of more interesting characters, but I’m very fond of Prowler because of a wonderful story starring him as the leading character: “The Power of Resistance”, published in Web of Spider Man Annual 10 (June 1994). I had completely forgotten that story, and you made it come back into my mind. Thank you! Now I’m going to read that issue again. : )

    • “My favorite Batman cover is Detective Comics # 120, because it reverses the abitual pattern of the first Detective Comics covers: instead of having the villain in a giant size and the heroes in a lilliputian size, we have exactly the opposite. It’s something new and unexpected, and I appreciated it.”
      That one is great, I’ll give you that. Penguin sures gets picked on this year. First caged and then electrocuted in #126. I also like DC #128 (Crimes in Reverse) where the Joker is holding the bank teller at gun point as he gives the teller the money.

      The Prowler. Wow, that’s a character I haven’t seen in a while. Wonder what happened to him?

      “I’m very fond of Prowler because of a wonderful story starring him as the leading character: “The Power of Resistance”, published in Web of Spider Man Annual 10 (June 1994).”
      What’s it about, if you don’t mind me asking?

      • That story shows Prowler acting as a superhero. He tries to dismantle a gang, and, when he gets closer to them, he finds out that the youngest member of the gang is a boy Prowler used to know when he was a child, and lived in the same neighborhood of Prowler.
        This discovery puts our hero in a difficult situation: what is the right thing to do? Putting that boy in jail with the other gangsters, or giving him a second chance, because he’s young and has a special connection with Prowler? That difficult choice is what made that story interesting. Do you want me to tell you the end of the story?

          • Exactly. But, since Prowler is “not your typical superhero”, that choice was not that expected. That’s why Prowler was a perfect choice for that story: it would have been too predictable with Batman or Spider Man in the leading role, a character being more outside of the norms was needed to make it work. And it worked so damn well. Cheers to Mike Lackey for writing that.

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